Tag Archives: movies

Minute Bodies: The Intimate World of F. Percy Smith – DVD and BluRay out now

My review of the excellent Minute Bodies: The Intimate World of F. Percy Smith is over at Flickering Myth now… also below…

Minute Bodies

A meditative and blissfully soothing piece of art cinema, Minute Bodies: The Intimate World of F Percy Smith is a 55 minute tribute to the work of the pioneering microbiologist, inventor, artist and filmmaker. Released on dual format DVD and Blu-ray by the BFI, the release is essentially a Staples’s creatively selected montage of Smith’s defined and elegant films of flora and fauna. Making use of previously untested techniques of time-lapse, animation and micro-photographic elements, Smith was part artist and part scientist, constantly looking for new ways to describe the secrets of nature.

With the true commitment of a hobbyist (Smith initially developed his film techniques  part-time while working as a clerk), Smith found brilliant methods of showcasing the world just beyond our senses. The film, sharing that clarity and vision, beautifully brings about the energy and passion of his work. Graceful images of insects dancing and flying about alien seeming landscapes are wonderfully sound-tracked by the composers, and help to create a powerfully relaxing effect. This alien-ness is intensified by the fact that there are no human voices at all in the film and no narrative to bring context to what the audience is witnessing. Simply put, it is life. And as alien and dreamlike as it all is, there is always the knowledge that all of this is around us all off the time. Mesmerising stuff.

Special Features 

Eight short films from the Secrets of Nature series, made by both F. Percy Smith and his fellow filmmaker Mary Field.

Find more information on Minute Bodies at www.minutebodies.com

Francofonia – Film Review

Review of feature documentary Francofonia at FM and below…

Francofonia from writer and director Aleksandr Sokurov (Russian Ark) is an inspiring and deeply affecting study of the meaning of art, humanity and memory. Making use of a strikingly original narrative template, the story veers around the entire structure of the Louvre museum in Paris, taking in its history, and specifically, but not exclusively, the building’s experience of Paris’s Nazi occupation during World War 2.

As with Russian Ark, that famous one-take feature, this is art that is not enabled by a quick pitch or solid beginning, middle and end. This is culture and life ringing out as clear as day, and Sokurov’s personal ruminations on the subjects of art, war and society sound out like one of the most fascinating lectures you were ever fortunate enough to receive at college.

francofonia-2

The theatrical pieces of French museum curator Jacques Jaujard (Louis-Do de Lencquesaing) and German Count Franz von Wolff-Meternich discussing the ideas of protecting works of art in the occupied museum offer a chillingly dreamlike sense of heightened realism to the film, which is made only more odd by the spirit of Napoleon Bonaparte roaming around the halls providing an 18th Century commentary on just how things are going.

Sokurov’s personal obsessions are also provided within a strange conversation between him speaking in Russian and an ocean going ship Captain talking in English caught in a trans-Atlantic storm. These sections are presumably telling us something about Sokurov’s ideas about time and space, but the meaning is unclear. What is for sure is that they add to the over-arching weirdness written all over this avant-garde and beautiful film.  As with his earlier film, the majesty of the visual flair on show is impressive and allows the audience into the sheer spectacle of great architecture.

Much of what Sokurov appears to be telling us seems to come down to the fact that the best of humanity, kept within museum walls such as the Louvre’s is ultimately extremely vulnerable and open to all sorts of base elements. Francofonia ultimately succeeds as a lyrical paean to art and how in order to survive as humans we must respect it and keep it safe.  At times when nothing is quite certain, keeping what’s best safe and sound can offer more comfort than most. With a haunting other-worldliness about the whole thing that is curiously frightening and at time wryly humourous, Francofonia more than deserves its place in the Museum for the Curious.

Comics books into movies – more lists…

Image

Comic book characters basically run the cinema these days. Well, them and emo flavoured legends and fables (Jack the Giant Slayer, Red Riding Hood, Hansel and Gretel etc…) Where once it was Howard the Duck and Captain America in wildly mocked 80’s movies, it’s now The Avengers and the X-Men bigging it up at the multiplexes. Fair enough. Not sure if it is a fad or what, but part of me hopes that there will be a ridiculous Secret Wars II style movie series with every character ever featured in it. But mostly Beyonder. He/She/It was fantastik.

Anyway, after some discussion about the phenomenon with other film writers on Flickering Myth, here is my list of the top 10 movie adaptations of comic books/graphic novels…

Batman Begins

Batman (89)

Superman (78)

A History of Violence

The Dark Knight

V for Vendetta

The Avengers

Dredd

Kick Ass

Spider Man (2002)

Image